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FCC looking into Netflix claims on ISPs slowing speeds for consumers

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Netflix launched their own brand of mockery a few weeks ago for Internet service providers a few weeks ago, by telling user’s their ISP was slowing the data connecting between Netflix and the consumer, forcing them to offer a lower bandwidth service.

Verizon got hit pretty hard by this, Netflix would put the statement between loading pages when the network was being slowed down, claiming it was Verizon’s fault for the lacklustre service. This lead many to complain to Verizon about connection downgrades and this in turn lead to Verizon sending a cease-and-desist claim to Netflix.

The mockery might be over for now, but the FCC has announced they will look into these claims about slowing speeds for consumers and ISPs forcing video companies like Netflix and YouTube to paid for the privilege of faster content delivering to the user.

This might lead to Netflix being able to demand the same service as the average Website, without having to pay surplus for the ISP to provide the service. This would be perfect net neutrality, but we doubt the FCC will reveal anything important in their investigation.

Ever since the FCC got their new Chairman, Tom Wheeler, claims have been made to say the government wing is now in the hands of the corporations. This has been backed up due to new initiatives to create fast lanes, backed by the FCC, which would be bad for small businesses and consumers.

Internet neutrality is one of the biggest topics in technology right now and the FCC is walking on a thin line, already changing people’s opinions on the organisation. New regulations and laws have made Comcast, Time Warner Cable, Verizon and other ISPs more happy, but the Internet in general is furious with the FCC’s moves.

Hundreds of tech companies are continuing to go against the actions of the FCC and ISPs to try and keep the Internet neutral. In Europe, countries signed a net-neutrality pact, but the US continues to have problems adapting these laws.

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