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Is cybercrime a blessing in disguise?


Job opportunities are rare to come by and it is not surprising to find so many graduates in the jobless corner or taking up jobs that they were not trained in.

Technological developments have come up with large amount of data that is mainly held online. Some of the data are quite sensitive and must be guided at all costs.

The data may come in the form of business secrets, security secrets, or personal data. And these are the center of interest of cybercriminals.

The cybercriminals have made cybersecurity a hot industry because the number and frequency of their attacks increase by the day. The cybercriminals device new methods daily and this keeps cybersecurity experts on their toes.

The data breaches have created job opportunities for cybersecurity experts and it is not wrong to say that if the security threats were to be totally eliminated, some people will lose their jobs.

Interestingly, it is not today, tomorrow or in the future that these threats will be eliminated. The crimes and the criminals are here to stay.

Cybersecurity requires people who are talented, smart and with creative minds. Such kinds of people are now in great demand and they are nowhere to be found.

So many Fortune 500 companies are busy hunting to hire these people to join their boards but it is difficult to find these brains these days.

So, if you feel that you can fit the bill, get out there and show your skills. Let’s see some of the opportunities and the associated benefits in this field:

A report from the Bureau of Labor statistics indicate that job opportunities in cybersecurity are anticipated to grow by up to 53 percent by the year 2018 and that the number of cybersecurity job posts doubled in 2013.

This is good news to job seekers since the jobs are highly paying. Cybersecurity product manager can earn a salary of up to $130,000 compared to only $100,000 paid to an average product manager. An average engineer is paid $70,000 while a cybersecurity engineer can pocket up to $145,000.

Jon Oltsik noted in a Network World article that 25 percent of organizations, 36 percent of government agencies, 29 percent of manufacturing companies and 28 percent of financial services firms have shortage of IT security skills.

Very few people entering the workforce seek jobs in cybersecurity. This can be attributed to the lack of knowledge by new students about these programs in colleges. A survey found that 82 percent of these new students were never informed about the opportunities existing in cybersecurities while they were in high school.

This job market is secure because the need is there and is ever growing. People overlook these opportunities just because of lack of understanding.

Those who are still in high school should be informed about these opportunities and the benefits they can enjoy so that they go to college when they are fully aware that cybersecurity is a field that will give them automatic and secure employment.

It may be rightfully said that cybercrime is a blessing in disguise.

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