Europe

Anti-Europe parties win big at European elections

on

Eurosceptic and far-right parties have gained good ground in the European elections this year on the centrist blocs who previously won the elections and still hold a majority overall in the EU.

The United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) and France National Front (FNF) both won the elections for their country, FNF gained 25% of all the votes and UKIP gained 27% of the votes.

In France, the National Front has become a rather well liked party following the issues with President Hollande Socialist party, who gained only 15% of all votes and hit the lowest ever EP score, showing the distaste in the party.

For the UK, it was more of a cluster for votes, UKIP managed to win with 27% but only by two percent to Labour, with the Conservatives one percent below Labour. The vote didn’t look good for the Lib Dems, who came fifth with the Green Party beating them on votes.

Germany is still firmly under the grasp of Angler Merkel, who gained 35% of all the votes for her Christian Union, the Social Democratic Party managed to gain 27% of the votes and all others were under 10% for Germany.

Other countries had the same back and forth between the far-right anti-Europe and the centralist groups, some voting against the EU and others voting to keep the country in the EU and make the union stronger, with more support and funding into the economy.

This turnaround might strike fear into those who work on the EU trading front and for those who want to move into more developed nations in Europe without immigration rules. The UK and France have had a lot of immigration over the past decade, leading to parties like UKIP growing in size.

In the UK, we are seeing more growing questions on UKIP as it comes closer to elections. Conservatives are going down in the ratings and Labour is still questionable on its intentions for future growth, while keeping the deficit in check.

There are no comments yet