World News: International Breaking News

Missing Malaysian MH370 (Infographic)


It appears there is much to know about the Malaysian MH370 that was recently published by the Washing Post thanks to the team who came up with it. Todd Lindeman, Laris Karklis, Gene Thorpe, Alberto Cuadra, Bonnie Berkowitz, and Richard Johnson gathered its information from NOAA, Honeywell, Department of Civil Aviation Malaysia, and other sources

The Boeing 777-200 airliner left Kuala Lumpur on March 8 at 12:41 a.m. with 239 passengers and crew members. It attained the cruising altitude of 35,000 feet 20 minutes later over the Taman Negara national park. This was confirmed by the air-traffic-control and the plane was 90 miles off the east coast of Malay at 1:21 a.m.

The airliner sharply turned westward and climbed to 45,000 feet and then returned to 29,500 feet, according to U.S. officials. The Malaysian military radar spotted it west of the Malay Peninsula. There is a possibility that the plane then flew northwards to Thai airspace.  Before its disappearance, it was tracked at 2:15 a.m. heading northwest. Carriers heading to Europe use the same route.

If the airliner went southwards, it would have exhausted its flight time in the radar-free-zone over the Indian Ocean on its way to Perth, Australia.

After failing to locate MH370 through normal ways, other strategies including automatic communications were deployed by the investigators.



Transponder communicates with the air-traffic-control sending a plane’s identification also referred to as civilian or secondary radar. MH370’s transponder switched off 40 minutes after taking off.


There was no more voice transmissions 26 minutes after take off, but some gadgets in the plane could have been able to send signals via short-range UHF radio or long-range on VHF through antennas.


The British company Inmarsat on Friday confirmed that the Malaysian airliner was equipped with equipments that keep sending signals off satellite. If its data is available, it can help track the plane’s trajectory.


This is a communication that sends information on how a plane is functioning to its manufacturer or to air-lines. According to U.S. officials, the MH370 engines operated for four hours after its transponder went off.

Emergency Locator Transmitter

It is usually located at the tail of the plane and automatically sends distress signal after a crash. The MH370’s appears to have been deactivated since it has not been detected.

Military Radar

This radar senses any flying object and doesn’t require a transponder. It’s through this radar that the Malaysian military detected the MH370 heading west after it went out the civilian radar.

There has bee no signal from under water locator beacon found on black box whose pulses can be detected no more than 14,000 feet from sea surface.


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